Barry Hurst, an instructor from the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., and 1st Class Cadet Gabriel Patterson, prepare to test a submersible remotely operated vehicle aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy in Seward, Alaska, Aug. 7, 2014. The Coast Guard Research and Development Center, based in New London, Conn., conducted an analysis of three ROVs during their exercise aboard the Healy. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert.

Coast Guard Research and Development Center conducts analysis of Remotely Operated Vehicles during Arctic mission

AT SEA – Being a multi-mission agency with a diverse range of responsibilities, the Coast Guard relies on a wide variety of technologies to do its job. The Coast Guard Research and Development Center evaluated the capabilities of many new […]


Crewmembers aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy retrieve the glider unit of a Wave Glider Unmanned Surface Vehicle from the ocean during an oil in ice exercise in the Arctic Aug. 21, 2014. The Wave Glider's glider unit can propel the device thousands of miles through the ocean using wave motion as its only power source. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert.

Coast Guard Research and Development Center deploys Unmanned Surface Vehicle during Arctic exercise

AT SEA – In order to expand its presence and understanding of the Arctic, the Coast Guard and its partners evaluated the capabilities of a variety of technologies during the Coast Guard Research and Development Center’s journey aboard the Coast […]


The Coast Guard Cutter SPAR transits Cold Bay, Monday, May 28, 2012, in The Gulf of Alaska. The SPAR is a 225-foot buoy tender stationed in Kodiak, Alaska. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Seaman Justin Hergert.

CGC SPAR supports “Kids Don’t Float”

Coast Guard Cutter SPAR took time from servicing aids to navigation Tuesday to visit the isolated community of Ouzinkie, Alaska, on the south side of Spruce Island just north of Kodiak to support the “Kids Don’t Float” campaign.


Alex Balsley, a program manager with the Coast Guard Research and Development Center in New London, Conn., reads an ice radar display while underway in the Arctic aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy Aug. 17, 2014. The Coast Guard is evaluating the system as part of its Arctic Strategy to test and refine the capabilities of Arctic resource requirements. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert.

Coast Guard Research and Development Center tests Ice Radar Navigation System during Arctic deployment

ALASKA – With its ever-changing ice conditions, the Arctic can be a difficult area to navigate. Seasonal and other shifts in the amount of ice passing through the region require sensitive equipment for vessels to transit safely and, as part […]


Lt. Cmdr. Royce James and Dr. Rich Paolino, both physics professors at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., prepare equipment for testing aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy's Arctic Survey Boat near Nome, Alaska, Aug. 12, 2014. The ASB will be equipped with a range of technologies intended to improve its effectiveness in the Arctic as part of the Arctic Craft Project during Arctic Shield 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Jason Story.

Coast Guard Arctic Craft Project looks to older technologies to tackle new challenges in Arctic

ALASKA – As defenders of U.S. marine resources and protectors of lives on the water, the Coast Guard must be always ready for action wherever the nation’s soil meets the sea. That includes the frigid water along the shores of […]


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Alaska’s Coast Guard reservists: Worth their weight in gold

Living in Alaska takes grit. The sprawling state, though full of adventure, leaves something to be desired in the way of creature comforts. Unless you are visiting one of the few-and-far-between municipalities, there is no fast food, no coffee shops and don’t even ask how much a gallon of milk costs.


Amy Sun, an advanced program lead for Lockheed-Martin, adjusts a UHF antenna aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy while underway near Alaska Aug. 10, 2014. Sun works with narrowband military satellite systems and is aboard the Healy to test the capabilities of the Mobile User Objective System in the Arctic. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer First Class Shawn Eggert.

Next generation satellite communications system to see testing aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy during Arctic Shield 2014

COAST GUARD CUTTER HEALY, At Sea – From studying the effects of solar activity to improve radio transmissions to enhancing the capabilities of Automated Identification Systems, the importance of having a reliable communications infrastructure in the Arctic has not been […]


Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Mike Turner, Arctic navigation lead for the Coast Guard Research and Development Center based in New London, Conn., explains the use of Automated Identification System software while underway aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy near Alaska Aug. 11, 2014. The Coast Guard and Marine Exchange of Alaska have teamed up to test the capabilities of existing electronic Maritime Safety Information infrastructure in the Arctic as part of Arctic Shield 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert.

Coast Guard, Marine Exchange of Alaska partner to build next generation of Arctic navigation and safety information system

NOME, Alaska – Between the rough seas, weather and ice the Arctic Ocean can be a dangerous place for navigation. Mariners who plied its waters in the past had little to rely on but radio traffic and a keen eye […]


Coast Guard Cutter SPAR sits moored in Nome, Alaska during their Arctic Shield 2014 deployment. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

CGC SPAR returns home from Arctic deployment

In the era of diminishing Arctic sea ice, the U.S. Coast Guard continually strives to build awareness, modernize governance and broaden partnerships. On the forefront of these missions is the crew of Coast Guard Cutter SPAR, who returned recently from a 38 day deployment in support of Operation Arctic Shield 2014.


Coast Guard launches boat in Nome, Alaska

When the Coast Guard comes to town

At 165 degrees 25 minutes west longitude, Nome, Alaska, is about as west as a person can get on the North American continent. The city lives up to the location. Modern day prospectors toil for gold in the shadows of age-old mining dredges.


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