Arctic research underway aboard CGC Healy

Science is officially in full swing aboard the CGC Healy and research operations are now underway. Personnel from the Coast Guard Research and Development Center are aboard the Healy again this summer to test and evaluate technologies for Coast Guard use in the Arctic.

The Coast Guard Cutter Healy breaks through ice in the Arctic circle, July 14, 2015. This image was taken by an Aerostat, a self-contained, compact platform that can deploy multiple sensor payloads and other devices into the air. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The Coast Guard Cutter Healy breaks through ice in the Arctic circle, July 14, 2015. This image was taken by an Aerostat, a self-contained, compact platform that can deploy multiple sensor payloads and other devices into the air. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk aircrew prepares to land on the deck of the Coast Guard Cutter Healy during a training exercise in the Arctic, July 3, 2015. The Jayhawk and Healy crews are deployed to the Arctic in support of Arctic Shield 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk aircrew prepares to land on the deck of the Coast Guard Cutter Healy during a training exercise in the Arctic, July 3, 2015. The Jayhawk and Healy crews are deployed to the Arctic in support of Arctic Shield 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A rescue swimmer is lowered to the ice from a Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter during a search and rescue exercise in the Arctic, July 14, 2015. Conducted over two days, the search and rescue exercise involved crews from the Coast Guard Cutter Healy and a Coast Guard Jayhawk working with scientists and interagency partners to test rescue capabilities off the North Shore of Alaska. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A rescue swimmer is lowered to the ice from a Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter during a search and rescue exercise in the Arctic, July 14, 2015. Conducted over two days, the search and rescue exercise involved crews from the Coast Guard Cutter Healy and a Coast Guard Jayhawk working with scientists and interagency partners to test rescue capabilities off the North Shore of Alaska. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

 

A conductivity temperature depth monitor is lowered into the Arctic Ocean from the Coast Guard Cutter Healy July 10, 2015. The CTD monitor will test the water for oxygen levels and salinity. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A conductivity temperature depth monitor is lowered into the Arctic Ocean from the Coast Guard Cutter Healy July 10, 2015. The CTD monitor will test the water for oxygen levels and salinity. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Scientists and crewmembers aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy learn how to put on survival suits during an abandon ship drill while underway in the Arctic, July 8, 2015. Hypothermia is always a concern in the Arctic, so personnel are reminded to dress as warmly as possible. ​(U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Scientists and crewmembers aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy learn how to put on survival suits during an abandon ship drill while underway in the Arctic, July 8, 2015. Hypothermia is always a concern in the Arctic, so personnel are reminded to dress as warmly as possible. ​(U.S. Coast Guard photo)

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration scientist Kevin Vollbrecht launches a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle from the bow of the Coast Guard Cutter Healy July 11, 2015. The Puma is being tested for flight and search and rescue capabilities. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration scientist Kevin Vollbrecht launches a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle from the bow of the Coast Guard Cutter Healy July 11, 2015. The Puma is being tested for flight and search and rescue capabilities. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A team of scientists from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration makes preparations to deploy a buoy into Arctic waters, July 1, 2015. ​This buoy will be deployed at sea for 3-4 months before being recovered. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A team of scientists from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration makes preparations to deploy a buoy into Arctic waters, July 1, 2015. ​This buoy will be deployed at sea for 3-4 months before being recovered. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A small-boat crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Healy works with scientists to place a device called a wave rider into Arctic waters for testing, July 11, 2015. ​The Healy is conducting operations in the Arctic with the Coast Guard Research and Development Center and scientists from various other agencies. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A small-boat crew from the Coast Guard Cutter Healy works with scientists to place a device called a wave rider into Arctic waters for testing, July 11, 2015. ​The Healy is conducting operations in the Arctic with the Coast Guard Research and Development Center and scientists from various other agencies. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Crewmembers aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy deploy the clump anchor into Arctic waters July 10, 2015. A buoy attached to the anchor will increase observational capabilities in the Arctic. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Crewmembers aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy deploy the clump anchor into Arctic waters July 10, 2015. A buoy attached to the anchor will increase observational capabilities in the Arctic. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guard Cutter Healy crewmembers move a 1,000 pound buoy into place for deployment in the Arctic, July 10, 2015. The buoy also has a clump anchor, which will keep it in place until it is recovered. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guard Cutter Healy crewmembers move a 1,000 pound buoy into place for deployment in the Arctic, July 10, 2015. The buoy also has a clump anchor, which will keep it in place until it is recovered. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

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