Chief Petty Officer Alex Haley was the first African-American journalist in the Coast Guard. He was the editor for Coast Guard publications such as the Outpost and the Helmsman.

African-American History Month: Alex Haley

February celebrates the strides of African-Americans throughout history. Many influential figures contributed to the progress of African-American culture in the United States. One of the most well known African-American figures in Coast Guard history is Chief Petty Officer Alex Haley.


The Coast Guard Reserve will celebrate 75 years of serving the United States Feb. 19, 2016. The theme for this anniversary is “Thank You,” as the organization would like to thank its members for their enduing commitment to professionalism, patriotism and preparedness and also to thank the American public for their continued faith and support.

Celebrating Coast Guard Reserve history: 75th anniversary of the “Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941”

February 19 marks the diamond anniversary for the Coast Guard Reserve, founded as part of the Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941. For 75 years Coast Guard Reserve members have served along side the active duty force in every major conflict, or crisis, this nation has faced.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Lee Johnson serves lunch to his shipmates at Marine Safety Office Valdez, Alaska.  Johnson joined to the Coast Guard to follow in the footsteps of his father.  U.S. Coast Guard photo.

African American History Month: Food Service Specialist 2nd Class Lee Johnson

Every February, the Coast Guard joins the nation in celebrating African American History Month. From Alex Haley to Jacob Lawrence, African American Coast Guardsmen have contributed to both their communities and the arts. At Marine Safety Office Valdez, Alaska, Petty Officer 2nd Class Lee Johnson continues that proud tradition for both the service and his family by pursuing the culinary arts.


D. Winifred Byrd and Julia Mosley stand proudly in front of a SPARs poster. African-American women were admitted into the SPARs in 1945. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

African-American History Month: SPAR

Coast Guard Cutter SPAR is a sea-going buoy tender homeported in Kodiak, Alaska. Its name is in honor of the first women to join the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve created November 23, 1942, also known as the SPARs. It wasn’t until February of 1945 that the first African-American women were admitted into the Coast Guard and able to serve as SPARs.


Chief Warrant Officer Darrel Howells II inspects a vessel while serving at Marine Safety Detachment Ketchikan, Alaska.  Howells served as an engineer after attended Damage Control “A” School on Governor’s Island, New York.   Photo provided by CWO Darrel Howells II.

Veterans Day 2015: CWO (Ret.) Darrel Howells II

Every year on November 11, Americans honor and thank their military veterans. Veterans Day celebrates those who committed to protecting and serving their country.

Darrel Howells II made that commitment when he joined the Coast Guard in March of 1983 in Boise, Idaho.


San Francisco Examiner

Veterans Day 2015: The Rescue Pilot

When we left off, Coast Guard Lt. Robert “Rip” Emerson was asking Adm. Chester W. Nimitz for appointment to fighter pilot school.


Hal Farrar rides aboard a Coast Guard cutterafter transferring from the Navy.  Farrar worked aboard buoy tenders, diver class vessels and three lighthouses during his time with the Coast Guard.  Photo provided by Hal Farrar.

Veterans Day 2015: Memories of a three war-veteran

Henry “Hal” Eaton Farrar was born in Little Rock, Ark., in 1926 to a family of farmers and ranchers. His father was a veterinarian who trained and cared for horses used in World War I and Farrar grew strong through hard work and long days on the family farm. Always big for his age, Farrar left the Georgia Military Academy to enlist with the Navy at the age of 17 and, with World War II in full swing, he reported to the Pacific theater to fight the Japanese.


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Veterans Day 2015: The Beach Master

Emerson’s first of many tests as a beach master came in the United States’ first combat engagement on the Atlantic front. For the uninitiated, the beach master’s role is to direct incoming landing craft onto shore during an assault. It’s a job that can only be accomplished by getting there first.


Family members wave as the Coast Guard Cutter Roanoke Island departs Homer, Alaska, for the last time, June 10, 2015. The cutter is transiting to the Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, to be decommissioned. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Aleksander Kay

Roanoke Island rendezvous with retirement

The Coast Guard Cutter Roanoke Island shrinks toward the horizon as family members gather on the pier to wave goodbye to the crew and cutter. After 23 years of excellent service, the Roanoke Island is making its final departure from Homer, Alaska.

June 10, 2015, the 110-foot cutter began the journey that marked the end of its Coast Guard career. The island-class patrol boat will travel to the Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, where it is scheduled to be decommissioned.


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A Bear With No Name

The polar bear, in its regal white coat, is as recognizably a part of the Arctic as perhaps any other symbol. It’s a tough creature, evolved very specifically from its southern kinfolk to survive in the world’s harshest environment.


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