Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Adam Harris, a member of a joint Coast Guard-Navy dive team deployed aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy, holds a Coast Guard ensign during a cold water ice dive off a Healy small boat in the Arctic, July 29, 2017. The joint dive team successfully completed the first shipboard Coast Guard dive operations in the Arctic in 11 years. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Bradbury.

Diving in: A new chapter at the top of the world

For the first time in 11 years, after the tragic deaths of Lt. Jessica Hill and Petty Officer 2nd Class Steven Duque, divers returned to the icy Arctic waters in support of the 2017 Coast Guard Research and Development Center Arctic patrol of Coast Guard Cutter Healy.

During the patrol, the team conducted cold water ice dive operations from both the small boat and a dive platform that was lowered from the Healy. A total of 18 dives were performed with a maximum depth of 38 feet and subsurface time of 18 minutes.


Afloat on a frigid frontier

As the Arctic-summer wind whipped rain-soaked faces on the buoy deck of Coast Guard Cutter Maple July 23, 2017, crew members silently contemplated the significance of their roles as a large yellow ball burst to the ocean’s surface off the port bow.


Coast Guard Hero: Bailey T. Barco

Long before the crew of the Bailey Barco made their 7,130-mile transit from Key West, Florida, to reach their homeport of Ketchikan May 12, their cutter’s namesake, Bailey T. Barco, took command a century ago as a keeper at the Dam Neck Life-Saving Station in Virginia Beach, Virginia.


Chief Petty Officer Alex Haley was the first African-American journalist in the Coast Guard. He was the editor for Coast Guard publications such as the Outpost and the Helmsman.

African-American History Month: Alex Haley

February celebrates the strides of African-Americans throughout history. Many influential figures contributed to the progress of African-American culture in the United States. One of the most well known African-American figures in Coast Guard history is Chief Petty Officer Alex Haley.


Celebrating Coast Guard Reserve history: 75th anniversary of the “Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941”

February 19 marks the diamond anniversary for the Coast Guard Reserve, founded as part of the Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941. For 75 years Coast Guard Reserve members have served along side the active duty force in every major conflict, or crisis, this nation has faced.


African American History Month: Food Service Specialist 2nd Class Lee Johnson

Every February, the Coast Guard joins the nation in celebrating African American History Month. From Alex Haley to Jacob Lawrence, African American Coast Guardsmen have contributed to both their communities and the arts. At Marine Safety Office Valdez, Alaska, Petty Officer 2nd Class Lee Johnson continues that proud tradition for both the service and his family by pursuing the culinary arts.


D. Winifred Byrd and Julia Mosley stand proudly in front of a SPARs poster. African-American women were admitted into the SPARs in 1945. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

African-American History Month: SPAR

Coast Guard Cutter SPAR is a sea-going buoy tender homeported in Kodiak, Alaska. Its name is in honor of the first women to join the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve created November 23, 1942, also known as the SPARs. It wasn’t until February of 1945 that the first African-American women were admitted into the Coast Guard and able to serve as SPARs.


Veterans Day 2015: CWO (Ret.) Darrel Howells II

Every year on November 11, Americans honor and thank their military veterans. Veterans Day celebrates those who committed to protecting and serving their country.

Darrel Howells II made that commitment when he joined the Coast Guard in March of 1983 in Boise, Idaho.


San Francisco Examiner

Veterans Day 2015: The Rescue Pilot

When we left off, Coast Guard Lt. Robert “Rip” Emerson was asking Adm. Chester W. Nimitz for appointment to fighter pilot school.


Veterans Day 2015: Memories of a three war-veteran

Henry “Hal” Eaton Farrar was born in Little Rock, Ark., in 1926 to a family of farmers and ranchers. His father was a veterinarian who trained and cared for horses used in World War I and Farrar grew strong through hard work and long days on the family farm. Always big for his age, Farrar left the Georgia Military Academy to enlist with the Navy at the age of 17 and, with World War II in full swing, he reported to the Pacific theater to fight the Japanese.


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