Coast Guard Cutter Bailey Barco: Key West to Ketchikan

The Coast Guard Cutter Bailey Barco will be the second 154-foot Fast Response Cutter homeported in Ketchikan, Alaska. The crew traveled 6,200 miles from Key West, Florida, to bring the cutter to its new homeport. The Barco is scheduled to be commissioned in Juneau, June 14, 2017.


Coast Guard Hero: Bailey T. Barco

Long before the crew of the Bailey Barco made their 7,130-mile transit from Key West, Florida, to reach their homeport of Ketchikan May 12, their cutter’s namesake, Bailey T. Barco, took command a century ago as a keeper at the Dam Neck Life-Saving Station in Virginia Beach, Virginia.


The Sector Anchorage command center coordinates, directs and monitors operations extending throughout Western Alaska, The North Slope, and the Aleutian Islands through Prince William Sound.

Lifesaving advantages of digital selective calling

It’s as simple as pressing a button. And if an emergency occurs, that might be all you have time for. The distance between someone in distress and their rescuers can be vast in Alaska. They could be hours away. A boater equipped with digital selective calling (DSC) distress signal capabilities just might possess one of the tools that could save their life.


Coast Guard’s newest FRC brings its capabilities to Ketchikan

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter John McCormick (WPC-1121) is the first fast response cutter to be stationed in Alaska after its crew completed the 6,200-mile journey from the shipyards of Louisiana to reach their homeport in Ketchikan.


From Bayou to Borough, FRC John McCormick comes to Ketchikan

Written by: Ensign Hailey Thompson The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter John McCormick took quite an adventure leading up to their commissioning in Ketchikan, Alaska, April 12. In Oct. 2016, the crew traveled to the Bollinger Shipyards, in Lockport, […]


The Coast Guard Research and Development Center and partners accomplished the service’s first autonomous net capture of an unmanned aerial system on board Coast Guard Cutter Healy July 9. The Coast Guard is evaluating methods to recover UAS that could be employed on platforms that are not equipped with flight decks. AeroVironment photo provided by John Ferguson.

Coast Guard Research & Development Center Conduct Autonomous Recovery of Unmanned Aircraft System

Coast Guard personnel from the Research and Development Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration continued their work aboard the icebreaker CGC Healy July 9 with the launch of a Puma unmanned aerial system. UAS are being tested by the Coast Guard for use in a wide range of Arctic missions!


The Coast Guard Cutter Farallon rests at a pier in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, June 14, 2015. The stop in Cabo San Lucas was one of eight port calls the crew made on their journey to Alaska. U.S. Coast Guard photo

USCGC Farallon trades tropical beaches for Arctic breezes

After more than 9,000 miles and 46 days underway, the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Farallon finally arrived at its new homeport in Valdez, Alaska, July 13, 2015.


A Coast Guard aircrew, forward deployed to Deadhorse, Alaska, performs maintenance on an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter at the Deadhorse Aviation Center. The aircrew was deployed to the Deadhorse forward operating location in support of Arctic Shield 2015. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Shawn Eggert

USCG aircrews from across the US travel to Alaska to assist with Arctic Shield 2015

Spanning more than 4-million square miles along the Alaskan coastline, Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak serves as a guardian to Alaskan mariners. With missions ranging from search and rescue to law enforcement, air station crews keep a busy schedule throughout the year. But, as ice in the Arctic recedes, another mission becomes important for the Coast Guard.

As part of Operation Arctic Shield, Air Station Kodiak deployed helicopters and personnel to a forward operating location in Deadhorse. In order to support both their primary missions and Arctic mission, the air station requested additional personnel from Coast Guard units across the United States.


Family members wave as the Coast Guard Cutter Roanoke Island departs Homer, Alaska, for the last time, June 10, 2015. The cutter is transiting to the Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, to be decommissioned. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Aleksander Kay

Roanoke Island rendezvous with retirement

The Coast Guard Cutter Roanoke Island shrinks toward the horizon as family members gather on the pier to wave goodbye to the crew and cutter. After 23 years of excellent service, the Roanoke Island is making its final departure from Homer, Alaska.

June 10, 2015, the 110-foot cutter began the journey that marked the end of its Coast Guard career. The island-class patrol boat will travel to the Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, where it is scheduled to be decommissioned.


A fresh start in 2015

Anyone who has sailed Alaskan waters can attest that the Last Frontier is not for the faint of heart. It takes a strong crew and a sturdy ship to brave the wind and waves of the 49th state, and the Coast Guard Cutter Chandeleur is eager for the challenge.


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