An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew returns to Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, to transfer a patient to emergency medical personnel after hoisting him from a cruise ship July 22, 2015. The 83-year-old man was suffering from symptoms of a heart attack aboard a Holland America cruise ship requiring a medevac for immediate medical attention. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson.

Achieving new heights: Alaska-qualified aircraft commander

With an extensive 44,000 miles of shoreline, Alaska has the largest area of responsibility of all the Coast Guard districts, it also has incredibly diverse landscape and weather patterns, making it uniquely challenging for mariners and aviators.


Crewmembers from the Coast Guard Cutter SPAR give Kids Don't Float training to children in Port Lions, Alaska, Feb. 18, 2016.  The KDF program provides water safety education to children throughout Alaska.  USCG photo.

Coast Guard Cutter SPAR forges bonds of goodwill during visit with Port Lions, Alaska, community

While servicing aids to navigation and conducting maritime law enforcement operations in Marmot Bay near Kodiak, Alaska, the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter SPAR paid a visit to the native village of Port Lions, AK. This is believed to be the first visit by a Coast Guard cutter to the village since its establishment after the Good Friday earthquake of 1964.


Chief Petty Officer Alex Haley was the first African-American journalist in the Coast Guard. He was the editor for Coast Guard publications such as the Outpost and the Helmsman.

African-American History Month: Alex Haley

February celebrates the strides of African-Americans throughout history. Many influential figures contributed to the progress of African-American culture in the United States. One of the most well known African-American figures in Coast Guard history is Chief Petty Officer Alex Haley.


Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Rosenthal, the Alaska Coast Guard Reservist of the Year, speaks at the Armed Services YMCA 39th Annual Salute to the Military in Anchorage, Alaska, Feb. 20, 2016. Rosenthal was selected to represent the Armed Services award recipients on stage. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Meredith Manning)

2015 Coast Guard 17th District Reserve Enlisted Person of the Year

Petty Officer 1st Class Seth Rosenthal, a reserve maritime enforcement specialist, was named the 2015 17th District Reserve Enlisted Person of the Year and was recognized at the Armed Services YMCA 39th Annual Salute to the Military in Anchorage, Alaska, February 20, 2016.


Armed Services YMCA 39th Annual Salute to the Military

2015 Coast Guard 17th District Enlisted Petty Officer of the Year

The 2015 Coast Guard 17th District Enlisted Petty Officer of the Year is Petty Officer 1st Class Russell Dever, a damage controlman aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Maple, homeported in Sitka, Alaska.


The Coast Guard Reserve will celebrate 75 years of serving the United States Feb. 19, 2016. The theme for this anniversary is “Thank You,” as the organization would like to thank its members for their enduing commitment to professionalism, patriotism and preparedness and also to thank the American public for their continued faith and support.

Celebrating Coast Guard Reserve history: 75th anniversary of the “Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941”

February 19 marks the diamond anniversary for the Coast Guard Reserve, founded as part of the Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941. For 75 years Coast Guard Reserve members have served along side the active duty force in every major conflict, or crisis, this nation has faced.


Petty Officer 2nd Class Lee Johnson serves lunch to his shipmates at Marine Safety Office Valdez, Alaska.  Johnson joined to the Coast Guard to follow in the footsteps of his father.  U.S. Coast Guard photo.

African American History Month: Food Service Specialist 2nd Class Lee Johnson

Every February, the Coast Guard joins the nation in celebrating African American History Month. From Alex Haley to Jacob Lawrence, African American Coast Guardsmen have contributed to both their communities and the arts. At Marine Safety Office Valdez, Alaska, Petty Officer 2nd Class Lee Johnson continues that proud tradition for both the service and his family by pursuing the culinary arts.


D. Winifred Byrd and Julia Mosley stand proudly in front of a SPARs poster. African-American women were admitted into the SPARs in 1945. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

African-American History Month: SPAR

Coast Guard Cutter SPAR is a sea-going buoy tender homeported in Kodiak, Alaska. Its name is in honor of the first women to join the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve created November 23, 1942, also known as the SPARs. It wasn’t until February of 1945 that the first African-American women were admitted into the Coast Guard and able to serve as SPARs.


Rebecca Brinkley stands with her husband Lt. Matthew Brinkley, commanding officer aboard the CGC Mustang. Rebecca was announced as Coast Guard District 17 Military Spouse of the year. U.S. Coast Guard photo

Mustang commanding officer’s wife named District 17 spouse of the year

Rebecca Brinkley married Coast Guard Lt. Matthew Brinkley in 2010. As soon as she said said ‘I do’ Rebecca dove head first into her role as a Coast Guard spouse. Her support for her husband and his unit lead to Rebecca being named the 2016 Armed Forces Insurance Military Spouse of the Year for Coast Guard District 17.


The Coast Guard, along with NOAA and Alaska Wildlife Trooper completed the Alaskan Resident Living Marine Resource Boarding Officer Class, an advance level law enforcement class for qualified boarding officers in the Coast Guard, at the North Pacific Regional Fisheries Training Center. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Kelly Parker.

Joining forces to protect Alaska’s natural resources

At the epicenter of major fishing activities in Alaska is the North Pacific Regional Fisheries Training Center. Located on Kodiak Island, the school is dedicated to training those in Living Marine Resource (LMR) enforcement.


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