Boater beware: Vessel documentation fraud lurks online

A new scam is targeting boat owners looking to save a little time online, but it’s costing them hundreds of dollars: Websites offering documentation renewal services for a fee.


Cruisin’ safely on Alaskan seas

Alaska’s untamed wilderness, amazing ecology and rich cultural history has drawn the attention of explorers, tourists and retirees for decades. In 2016, the Alaska Cruise Association estimated more than one million cruise ship passengers visited Alaska fueling the state’s economy […]


Unit Spotlight: “Bulldog of the Bering” Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley

Known as the “Bulldog of the Bering,” the Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley is 238-feet of heavy steel defending Alaskan and Arctic waters and protecting the lives of sailors braving those tumultuous seas.


The crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Maple follows the crew of Canadian Coast Guard Icebreaker Terry Fox through the icy waters of Franklin Strait, in Nunavut Canada, August 11, 2017. The Canadian Coast Guard assisted Maple's crew by breaking and helping navigate through ice during several days of Maple's 2017 Northwest Passage transit. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nate Littlejohn.

Allies in the Arctic

The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Maple arrived to Coast Guard Yard in Baltimore, Maryland, Tuesday, after a journey of more than 7,000 miles through the Arctic from Sitka, Alaska.

Cutter Maple spent 27 days above the Arctic Circle, first navigating Alaskan waters then through the Arctic to the Atlantic Ocean. Coincidently, the summer of 2017 marks the 60th anniversary of the Coast Guard’s first Northwest Passage expedition that departed Seattle, Washington, July 1, 1957.


Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Adam Harris, a member of a joint Coast Guard-Navy dive team deployed aboard Coast Guard Cutter Healy, holds a Coast Guard ensign during a cold water ice dive off a Healy small boat in the Arctic, July 29, 2017. The joint dive team successfully completed the first shipboard Coast Guard dive operations in the Arctic in 11 years. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Bradbury.

Diving in: A new chapter at the top of the world

For the first time in 11 years, after the tragic deaths of Lt. Jessica Hill and Petty Officer 2nd Class Steven Duque, divers returned to the icy Arctic waters in support of the 2017 Coast Guard Research and Development Center Arctic patrol of Coast Guard Cutter Healy.

During the patrol, the team conducted cold water ice dive operations from both the small boat and a dive platform that was lowered from the Healy. A total of 18 dives were performed with a maximum depth of 38 feet and subsurface time of 18 minutes.


Skimming the surface of Arctic oil recovery

By Petty Officer 2nd Class Meredith Manning The chances of oil spills become more likely as permanent sea ice diminishes in the Arctic and maritime activity increases. As the federal response agency for offshore spills, the Coast Guard is exploring […]


Coast Guard brings oil spill response assurance to North Slope residents

In an era where most of the United States has easy access to information at the click of a button, Alaska remains unique. Vast distances between communities combined with a lack of technological infrastructure makes getting information to rural communities a challenge.


Coast Guard celebrates 227 years of service to the Nation

Coast Guard members from across Alaska share why they joined during this Coast Guard Day. Why did you join the Coast Guard?                                     […]


Afloat on a frigid frontier

As the Arctic-summer wind whipped rain-soaked faces on the buoy deck of Coast Guard Cutter Maple July 23, 2017, crew members silently contemplated the significance of their roles as a large yellow ball burst to the ocean’s surface off the port bow.


Challenges loom large in Arctic – So do the rewards

Things are a little different in the Arctic. Logistics are a strain. Distances are vast. The weather is always a wildcard.


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