Petty Officer 2nd Class Christine Parham, a health services technician at Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, is one of the few paramedics in the Coast Guard. After joining in 2013 and training in Cape May, New Jersey, Parham begged to come to Kodiak to be an Aviation Mission Specialist. U.S. Coast Guard video by Petty Officer 2nd Class Meredith Manning and Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Steenson

Coast Guard flight paramedic provides higher level of care in Alaska

Wearing a bright orange drysuit and large blue helmet while carrying gear that looks to weigh twice as much as she does, a small-framed, 5-foot coastguardsman rushes to the waiting helicopter. She throws her gear in and takes her seat amongst the rest of the crew. Though not in her job description, she prepares to take flight on a search and rescue case in the last frontier.


Perchard Award second half 2016 featured image.

Perchard Award: Second Half 2016

Twice a year, Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak recognizes four air station members for their exemplary performance and superior technical, aviation, professional, and leadership abilities with three Lt. Robert A. Perchard Memorial Trophies and one General Service Award. The Lt. […]


Through the Lens: Alaska Village Student Outreach

As part of the Sun’arausqat Katurgwiat (The Young People’s Gathering Place), Coast Guard units from across Team Kodiak hosted youth from villages and communities around Kodiak Island.


Perchard Award: First Half 2016

Twice a year, Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak recognizes four air station members for their exemplary performance and superior technical, aviation, professional, and leadership abilities with three Lt. Robert A. Perchard Memorial Trophies and one General Service Award. Here are the awardees for the first half of 2016.


An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew returns to Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, to transfer a patient to emergency medical personnel after hoisting him from a cruise ship July 22, 2015. The 83-year-old man was suffering from symptoms of a heart attack aboard a Holland America cruise ship requiring a medevac for immediate medical attention. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson.

Achieving new heights: Alaska-qualified aircraft commander

With an extensive 44,000 miles of shoreline, Alaska has the largest area of responsibility of all the Coast Guard districts, it also has incredibly diverse landscape and weather patterns, making it uniquely challenging for mariners and aviators.


Santa, along with his elves and Air Station Kodiak aircrews prepare for an early morning takeoff.

Through the Lens: Santa to the Villages

Since 1974, Kodiak-based Coast Guard crews have been bringing holiday cheer, presents, books and warm garments to children in the remote villages on Kodiak Island, and the tradition continues this year.


Hitchin’ a ride: AK Air National Guard gives Coast Guard a lift as FOL Deadhorse shutters

Personnel from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, hitched a ride home from Forward Operating Location Deadhorse aboard a C-17 Globemaster III airplane courtesy of the Alaska Air National Guard’s 249th Airlift Squadron Oct. 14, 2015.


Petty Officer 3rd Class James Abel, an avionics electrical technician from Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, prepares to deploy an oceanic data-collecting probe over the Arctic Circle. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson.

90 degrees North

Take a flight to the North Pole on an Air Station Kodiak HC-130 Hercules airplane, along with scientist from the University of Washington, as they deploy probes to the icey-waters below in an attempt to study the ever changing Arctic.


Flying into the future

It’s pivotal that a rescue crew, whether on the water or in the sky, has the full use of their wits and physical power when it matters most. Utilizing an unmanned system that could potentially spot survivors or wreckage from high in the sky could reduce the time rescue crews spend searching, and ultimately reduce the time that victims spend at the mercy of the elements.


A Coast Guard Cutter Healy tie-down team moves in to secure an Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, MH-60 Jayhawk to the flight deck southwest of Kodiak Island, July 3, 2015. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Kelly Parker.

From air to sea

Forty-one by 40-feet is the size of the flight deck of the Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a 420-foot polar icebreaker currently deployed to the Arctic. To land a on the cutter, aircrews and deck crews not only have to manage with a ship that moves forward in the water, but also one that moves with the seas.


Next Page »