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The stuff that matters: Holiday boating safety gift ideas

Gift them with a safe return home while on Alaska’s waterways. The gift of safety saves more than money.


Members of Juneau, Alaska, area Coast Guard attempt to stay afloat using special techniques during Kids Don’t Float instructor training Nov. 16, 2016. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jon-Paul Rios

Saving lives across generations

The water was a balmy 80 degrees and calm. A wave rippled across its surface as a small, orange boat sank to the waterline. The four people aboard quickly exited the boat into the water. A voice overhead was instructing them to “conserve energy and float nearby.”


Petty Officer 3rd Class Sarabeth Duke and Petty Officer 3rd Class Hamilton Cleverdon sit with students after a Kids Don't Float demonstration at Diomede School in Little Diomede, Alaska, February 19, 2016. Kids Don't Float is a Coast Guard and Alaska Office of Boating Safety program that teaches children about safety on the water. U.S. Coast Guard photo

Kids Don’t Float teaches children lessons for life

When seven-year-old Sam Fredrickson plunged into the water during a hunting trip with his father, Walter Washington Sr., and a family friend, near Angoon, Alaska, it was Sam’s quick thinking and use of boating safety equipment that ultimately saved their lives.


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Boating Safety at the Hub of the Kuskokwim

It’s only natural that the people of river communities spend a lot of time on, or near, the water, even at an early age. With so many boaters using the frigid, powerful river, its inherent ability to take life contrasts harshly to its life-giving benefits. All over Alaska, waters like the Kuskokwim contribute to one of the highest boating fatality rates in the nation.