Another successful trip for Coast Guard Cutter Maple

 

SERGIUS NARROWS, Alaska - Coast Guard Cutter Maple crewmembers service the Sergius Narrows Buoy in April 2011. Crewmembers work to safely secure the buoy on the ship's buoy deck. Sergius Narrows, located in Peril Strait, is a 150 yard channel, making it the narrowest waterway Maple services ATON in. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Mitchel Frick.

SERGIUS NARROWS, Alaska - Coast Guard Cutter Maple crewmembers service the Sergius Narrows Buoy in April 2011. Crewmembers work to safely secure the buoy on the ship's buoy deck. Sergius Narrows, located in Peril Strait, is a 150 yard channel, making it the narrowest waterway Maple services ATON in. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Mitchel Frick.

Written by Ens. Clare Delanoy, CGC Maple

Coast Guard Cutter Maple returned home to Sitka after a vigorous trip filled with training and servicing aids to navigation throughout Icy Strait and Lynn Canal. All evolutions were very successful and the crew enjoyed some gorgeous weather along the inside passage of Southeast Alaska. Clear days can be few and far between in the Southeast, but when they do occur the mountains in the distance are quite a sight to see.

The primary missions of Maple are servicing aids to navigation, conducting law enforcement, and responding to search and rescue. In addition to these missions, Maple crewmembers are responsible for shipboard safety and become the first line of defense for any casualty while the ship is underway. The crew needs to be proficient in responding to engineering casualties and any damage which may result from fire or flooding. The crew is constantly training with different casualty scenarios to prepare to respond at any moment. It can be a long process, especially for new personnel, but one that is not taken lightly. Maple crewmembers will be evaluated in August in Honolulu during Maple’s Tailored Ships Training Availability on their ability to properly and efficiently respond to such casualties.

SITKA, Alaska - Coast Guard Cutter Maple crewmembers service the Indian River Buoy on April 30, 2011.  These three buoys are located in the eastern anchorage just south of Sitka.  The city of Sitka can be seen in the background.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Mitchel Frick.

SITKA, Alaska - Coast Guard Cutter Maple crewmembers service the Indian River Buoy on April 30, 2011. These three buoys are located in the eastern anchorage just south of Sitka. The city of Sitka can be seen in the background. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Mitchel Frick.

During the end of this patrol Maple could actually be seen in its own backyard as it serviced the three Indian River buoys. These buoys protect fishermen from the shoal water surrounding Totem Park as they transit out of the southern side of Sitka Harbor. As Maple stayed anchored in the harbor, the commanding officer was taken ashore in the cutter’s small boat to attend the celebration of the city of Sitka being designated “A Coast Guard City.” On April 30th, Sitka became the 12th “Coast Guard City” joining Kodiak as the second city in Alaska to be designated as such. Sitka has a very close relationship to Coast Guardsmen and their families which is apparent through the support the city provides. The Coast Guard City program began in 1998 as a way to recognize the support the Coast Guard personnel receive from a city.

Maple crewmembers accomplished quite a lot on this trip between the properly serviced aids and the shipboard training that was conducted. They have been working extremely hard and should all be very proud of themselves and their achievements. Their dedication does not go unnoticed.

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