‘Tis the season for Boating Safety: 10 boating safety holiday gift ideas

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter SPAR marches with Santa, elves and presents through the village of Old Harbor, Alaska, Tuesday, Dec. 04, 2012. This year members of Marine Safety Detachment Kodiak also joined the crew of the SPAR, Santa and his elves to deliver holiday cheer to the children of Old Harbor. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Klingenberg.

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter SPAR marches with Santa, elves and presents through the village of Old Harbor, Alaska, Tuesday, Dec. 04, 2012. This year members of Marine Safety Detachment Kodiak also joined the crew of the SPAR, Santa and his elves to deliver holiday cheer to the children of Old Harbor. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Klingenberg.

 

Have you been struggling to find the perfect gift for your friendly fisherman or avid boater? You can give them a gift that will keep them safe while they are out on the water this season. From stocking stuffers to safety seminars, safety is the gift that’s in season.

Stocking stuffers:

First aid kit in a water tight container- First aid kits provide boaters with a variety of medical supplies to use in case of emergency.

Nautical charts of local areas can provide boaters with safe navigational routes in unfamiliar areas or in the case of GPS failure.

Nautical charts– Nautical charts of local areas can provide boaters with safe navigational routes in unfamiliar areas or in the case of GPS failure.

 

 

Navigation Rules require sound signals to be made under certain circumstances; all boaters should have them on board.

Sound producing devices- Navigation Rules require sound signals to be made under certain circumstances; all boaters should have them on board.

 

 

Pyrotechnic devices, distress flags, distress lights and signaling mirrors provide visual ways for boaters to get attention when in distress. All boaters should be able to signal for help. Signaling devices are recommended when operating on all open bodies of water.

Visual distress signals– Pyrotechnic devices, distress flags, distress lights and signaling mirrors provide visual ways for boaters to get attention when in distress. All boaters should be able to signal for help. Signaling devices are recommended when operating on all open bodies of water.

 

 

 

VHF marine radio– Radios allow boaters to contact other vessels or the Coast Guard when in need of assistance. New VHF and HF radiotelephones have digital selective calling capability which allows boaters to instantly send an automatically formatted distress alert to the Coast Guard or other rescue authority anywhere in the world.

Gifts:

EPIRBs are specialized radio transmitters that are designed for use in situations of grave or imminent danger or when lives are at risk. Remind the recipient to register the EPIRB or rescuers may be delayed in responding.
Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon– EPIRBs are specialized radio transmitters that are designed for use in situations of grave or imminent danger or when lives are at risk. Remind the recipient to register the EPIRB or rescuers may be delayed in responding.

 

It is recommended that extinguishers be mounted in a readily accessible location on all vessels. Consider locations where the extinguisher can be reached easily; for example, at or near the steering station or in the galley or engine room, but away from locations where a fire may likely start.
Fire extinguisher– It is recommended that extinguishers be mounted in a readily accessible location on all vessels. Consider locations where the extinguisher can be reached easily; for example, at or near the steering station or in the galley or engine room, but away from locations where a fire may likely start.

 

 

All recreational vessels must carry one wearable life jacket for each person aboard. Life jacket– All recreational vessels must carry one wearable life jacket for each person aboard.

Life jackets must be:

• U.S. Coast Guard-approved (check the label)

• In good and serviceable condition

• Appropriate size and type for the intended user

 

Throwable devices are intended for use anywhere. They are designed to be thrown to a person in the water and grasped and held by the user until rescued.
Throwable device- Throwable devices are intended for use anywhere. They are designed to be thrown to a person in the water and grasped and held by the user until rescued.

 

Free Coast Guard Auxiliary boating courses provide instruction to boaters at all levels, from the fundamental to the advanced.

Boating safety education– Free Coast Guard Auxiliary boating courses provide instruction to boaters at all levels, from the fundamental to the advanced.

 

 

No matter what level of enthusiasm or how many years your loved one has spent on the water, any of these items can help make boating a safer, more enjoyable experience. Consider giving the boating enthusiast in your family a life saving gift this holiday season. For more boating safety information visit: http://www.uscgboating.org/images/420.PDF

Tags: , ,