Lt. Paul Johansen stands in front of a Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter in Alaska.

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Lt. Paul Johansen

It’s a story that sounds as if it were pulled right from the movies. High winds, rough seas, a rescue helicopter low on fuel and a crew determined to save a life. But the danger was real for the Kodiak, Alaska-based Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew on a mission to save the life of a cargo vessel crewman.


Aids to Navigation Team Kodiak, 2017

Unit spotlight: Aids to Navigation Team Kodiak

Every mariner who takes to the sea plots their course and navigates day and night, through storms or calm seas with one constant to rely on; navigational aids. The Coast Guard has been committed to keeping the maritime community safe by maintaining navigational aids since the first American lighthouse was illuminated in Boston Harbor in 1716. The United States placed its first aids to navigation in Alaskan waters in 1884.


The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley patrols the North Pacific in support of Operation Arctic Shield 2015. The main objective of Operation Arctic Shield is to enhance and improve preparedness, prevention and response capabilities due to increasing human activity in the Arctic. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jesse Kristofferson)

75 days patrolling the Last Frontier

The Coast Guard Cutter Alex Haley returned to their homeport of Kodiak, Alaska, Jan. 22, 2017, after a 75-day patrol. The cutter’s path took her 10,000 miles through the Bering Sea.


Capt. Sam Jordan, commanding officer of Coast Guard Cutter Munro (WHEC-724), completes the 41st Marine Corps Marathon last month.

Coast Guard captain runs Marine Corps Marathon

Capt. Sam Jordan completed the 41st Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday Oct. 30, 2016 . He averaged 14-minute miles and came in with a finishing time of just over six hours. An incredible feat for someone that has spent over 115 days at sea since January 1st.


2016 American Legion Spirit of Service recipient Petty Officer 2nd Class Geneva L. Cornelius, USCG speaks during the General Session of The American Legion 98th National Convention at the Duke Energy Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, on Tuesday, August 30. Photo by Lucas Carter/The American Legion

Honor, Respect, Devotion to Duty: Petty Officer Geneva Cornelius

Petty Officer 2nd Class Geneva Cornelius actively participated in over 50 unit and local community events during her time in Kodiak, Alaska, dedicating countless hours during her off time to community service and enthusiastically pursues more opportunities to help others where ever she is. Her giving spirit has brought resources, services, joy and light to countless lives, yet Geneva Cornelius has cracked the code that helping others in turn helps you find true happiness.


A Coast Guard Air station Kodiak aircrew spends time with Kotzebue community members in Kotzebue, Alaska, Aug. 10, 2016. The HC-130 crew transported thousands of pounds of frozen halibut for hunger relief.

Flying fish – Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak conducts humanitarian flight for hunger relief

A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak HC-130 crew teamed up with the non-profit organization, SeaShare, to transport approximately 15,000 lbs of frozen halibut to Kotzebue and Nome, Alaska, August 10, 2016. The halibut is by-catch donated from commercial fisheries to be distributed to remote Alaskan communities as a food source throughout the winter.


Three Coast Guard police officers stand next to the police car at Coast Guard Base Kodiak, Alaska, May 12, 2016. The Kodiak Coast Guard military police have an area of responsibility of over 20,000 acres. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson.

National Police Week 2016: Coast Guard Base Kodiak military police

As we honor our nation’s law enforcement officers during National Police Week, May 15-21, we are highlighting the Coast Guard’s very own police officers here in Kodiak, Alaska.


An MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew returns to Air Station Kodiak, Alaska, to transfer a patient to emergency medical personnel after hoisting him from a cruise ship July 22, 2015. The 83-year-old man was suffering from symptoms of a heart attack aboard a Holland America cruise ship requiring a medevac for immediate medical attention. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lauren Steenson.

Achieving new heights: Alaska-qualified aircraft commander

With an extensive 44,000 miles of shoreline, Alaska has the largest area of responsibility of all the Coast Guard districts, it also has incredibly diverse landscape and weather patterns, making it uniquely challenging for mariners and aviators.


D. Winifred Byrd and Julia Mosley stand proudly in front of a SPARs poster. African-American women were admitted into the SPARs in 1945. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

African-American History Month: SPAR

Coast Guard Cutter SPAR is a sea-going buoy tender homeported in Kodiak, Alaska. Its name is in honor of the first women to join the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve created November 23, 1942, also known as the SPARs. It wasn’t until February of 1945 that the first African-American women were admitted into the Coast Guard and able to serve as SPARs.


Tim, Sarah, Carter and Aaron Daugherty relax together on the couch with their two dogs after bringing Carter home from the hospital in early January 2016.

New year, new beginnings, and for this Coast Guard family – new baby!

Carter Daugherty got the honorary distinction of being the first baby born in Alaska in 2016. Born at 12:57 a.m., Jan. 1, 2016, he is welcomed by his parents, Tim and Sarah, and his big brother, four-year-old Aaron.


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